Excerpts

 

This material is excerpted, with the kind permission of the publisher, from a special issue of The Journal of Psychiatry & Law that was guest edited by Gregory DeClue and overseen by JP&L Editor-in-Chief Philip Witt.  

 

DeClue, G. (2009). Introduction to the special issue on interrogations and confessions. Open Access Journal of Forensic Psychology, 1, E1-E2.                  

 

Lassiter, G. D. & Lindberg, M. J. (2009). Video recording custodial interrogations: The Devil’s in the details. Open Access Journal of Forensic Psychology, 1, E3-E10.

 

Gudjonsson, G. H., Sigurdsson, J. F., & Sigfusdottir, I. D.  (2009). Interrogation and False Confessions among Adolescents:  Differences between Bullies and Victims. Open Access Journal of Forensic Psychology, 1, E11-E22.

 

Sullivan, T. P. (2009). The evolution of law enforcement attitudes to recording custodial interviews. Open Access Journal of Forensic Psychology, 1, E23-E43.

 

Fulero, S. (2009). Admissibility of expert testimony based on the Grisso and Gudjonsson scales in disputed confession cases. Open Access Journal of Forensic Psychology, 1, E44-E55.

 

Vrij, A., Granhag, P. A., & Mann, S. (2009). Good liars. Open Access Journal of Forensic Psychology, 1, E56-E67.

 

Walsh, D., & Bull, R. (2009). Interviewing suspects of fraud: An in-depth analysis of interview skills. Open Access Journal of Forensic Psychology, 1, E68-E80.

 

DeClue, G. (2009). Three things we have learned from studying investigative interviews by police that should be used to guide investigative interviews by military and intelligence agencies. Open Access Journal of Forensic Psychology, 1, E81-E89.       

 

Leo, R. A. & Davis, D. (2009). From false confessions to wrongful conviction: Seven psychological processes. Open Access Journal of Forensic Psychology, 1,90-113.